<!DOCTYPE HTML PUBLIC "-//W3C//DTD HTML 3.2//EN">
<HTML>
<HEAD>
<META HTTP-EQUIV="Content-Type" CONTENT="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1">
<META NAME="Generator" CONTENT="MS Exchange Server version 6.5.7652.24">
<TITLE>RE: [CMake] improve the CMake language?</TITLE>
</HEAD>
<BODY>
<!-- Converted from text/plain format -->

<P><FONT SIZE=2>It is my understanding that a lot of the cmake modules are implemented in the cmake language?&nbsp; It would be a big task to maintain multiple languages for the cmake modules.<BR>
<BR>
While speed of a scripting language is interesting, I would expect 90% of the work would be done in the C++ part of cmake.&nbsp; I would think BSD type licensing and compactness would be more important.<BR>
<BR>
Juan<BR>
<BR>
-----Original Message-----<BR>
From: cmake-bounces+juan.sanchez=amd.com@cmake.org on behalf of Gonzalo Garramuņo<BR>
Sent: Mon 11/5/2007 4:55 PM<BR>
To: Ken Martin; CMake ML; Sanchez, Juan<BR>
Subject: Re: [CMake] improve the CMake language?<BR>
<BR>
Ken Martin wrote:<BR>
&gt; I have looked at incorporating Lua into CMake as an alternate language.<BR>
<BR>
Interesting.&nbsp; You didn't by any chance used swig to wrap it?<BR>
<BR>
I admit I would be curious to see that fork of cmake to study the changes.<BR>
<BR>
Using swig right now would be the best approach, as with just a few swig<BR>
rules (if any) it would allow any user to choose whatever language he<BR>
feels like using.<BR>
<BR>
Currently, swig supports all languages mentioned in this thread so far<BR>
and it works pretty well for projects like cmake where its .h files keep<BR>
changing.<BR>
<BR>
Eventually one scripting language could end up becoming massively more<BR>
popular and be adopted as a &quot;standard&quot; for cmake.&nbsp; But I'm betting in<BR>
the future that won't matter, as several vendors are developing tools or<BR>
frameworks to offer data interchange across the major scripting languages.<BR>
<BR>
--<BR>
<BR>
For those that don't know Lua, Lua has a very similar syntax to non-OO<BR>
ruby albeit parenthesis are required.&nbsp; It is also very fast, small and,<BR>
just like TCL, thread safe and built for embedding (python and ruby<BR>
still struggle with threads).&nbsp; LuaJIT is probably one of the fastest JIT<BR>
compilers for a dynamic language under any platform.<BR>
Lua's uglyness is its OO support and syntax, which is closer to OO<BR>
Javascript or Perl's.<BR>
<BR>
--<BR>
<BR>
P.S. Disclosure: I am swig's ruby maintainer.<BR>
<BR>
<BR>
--<BR>
Gonzalo Garramuņo<BR>
ggarra@advancedsl.com.ar<BR>
<BR>
AMD4400 - ASUS48N-E<BR>
GeForce7300GT<BR>
Kubuntu Edgy<BR>
_______________________________________________<BR>
CMake mailing list<BR>
CMake@cmake.org<BR>
<A HREF="http://www.cmake.org/mailman/listinfo/cmake">http://www.cmake.org/mailman/listinfo/cmake</A><BR>
<BR>
<BR>
<BR>
</FONT>
</P>

</BODY>
</HTML>