<br><br><div><span class="gmail_quote">2007/6/14, Brandon Van Every &lt;<a href="mailto:bvanevery@gmail.com">bvanevery@gmail.com</a>&gt;:</span><blockquote class="gmail_quote" style="border-left: 1px solid rgb(204, 204, 204); margin: 0pt 0pt 0pt 0.8ex; padding-left: 1ex;">
On 6/13/07, Jesper Eskilson &lt;<a href="mailto:jesper@eskilson.se">jesper@eskilson.se</a>&gt; wrote:<br>&gt; 2007/6/13, Brandon Van Every &lt;<a href="mailto:bvanevery@gmail.com">bvanevery@gmail.com</a>&gt;:<br>&gt; &gt;
<br>&gt; &gt; But why don&#39;t you just ship your users a dynamic lib?&nbsp;&nbsp;As far as I<br>&gt; &gt; know, there are no restrictions on dynamic libs including static libs.<br>&gt;<br>&gt; That is an alternative, but it requires a non-trivial amount of work,
<br>&gt; testing, documentation fixes etc., which I&#39;d prefer not to embark on<br>&gt; at the moment.<br><br>I take it you have no infrastructure for dynamic libs at all in your<br>code then?&nbsp;&nbsp;Because if you did, like all your declspecs and so forth,
<br>it&#39;s pretty easy to add in CMake.&nbsp;&nbsp;</blockquote><div><br>The problem isn&#39;t CMake in that case, it&#39;s updating all the stuff around it which assumes that the lib is static: documentation (the lib is part of a SDK shipped to customers), testing, etc. That&#39;s not something I want to do at this time.
<br>&nbsp;<br>Is it really impossible to pass an option to the linker when creating a static library?<br></div></div><br>-- <br>/Jesper